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Moon Page   OVERVIEW ECLIPSES OF THE SUN AND MOON   Mond Seite   Maan Pagina

From 2000 till now.


All future solar and lunar eclipses. See: NASA Eclips Web Site.

Solar and lunar eclipses for 2013. See our web page: About Our Moon.


The dates and types of eclipses during 2012 are as follows.

Annular eclpis in China 20102012, May 20: Annular solar eclips. The first solar eclipse of 2012 occurs  in the central part of constellation Taurus. The eclips starts at 22:30 UT and lasts two hours. An annular eclipse, as a ring of fire, will be visible from a 240 to 300 kilometre-wide track that traverses eastern Asia, the northern Pacific Ocean and the western United States. A partial eclipse is seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, that includes much of Asia, the Pacific and the western 2/3 of North America. The annularity starts at 23:30 UT and lasts only five minutes. Source: NASA Eclips Web Site with more details.

Strawberry lunar eclips2012, Jun 04: Partial Lunar Eclipse. The Moon will pass through the shadow of Earth, producing a partial lunar eclipse visible across the Pacific from China to the United States. At 3:00 am Pacific Daylight Time, not long before sunrise on Monday, June 4th, the Moon passes directly behind our planet. A broad stretch of lunar terrain around the southern crater Tycho will fall under the shadow of Earth, producing the first lunar eclipse of 2012. At maximum eclipse, around 4:04 am PDT, 37% of the Moon's surface will be in the dark. The eclipse is visible in North and South America, Australia, eastern parts of Asia and all across the Pacific Ocean. On the Atlantic side of the United States, the eclipse occurs just as the Moon is setting in the west. Right you see a strawberry moon eclipse (June 2010). Source: NASA Science News. Visit NASA Eclipse Web Site for the Universal Times for this eclipse and for more information.

Antarctic Total Solar Eclipse 20032012, Nov 13: Total Solar Eclipse. The second solar eclipse of 2012 is not visible in the most parts of our world. You can look at webcams from countries around the southern part of the Pacific Ocean. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow crosses the South Pacific Ocean where it makes no landfall except for northern Australia. The Moon's penumbral shadow produces a partial eclipse visible from a much larger region covering the South Pacific (including Australia and New Zealand), southern South America, and a part of Antarctica. Source: NASA Eclips Web Site with more details.

Totale penumbrale maaneclips, 19992012, Nov 28 2012: Partly Penumbral Moon eclipse. The eclipse is visible in large parts of North-America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia, included New Zealand. Not visible above South America, the Atlantic Ocean and not or hardly in the Atlantic coastal areas, with the cities such as New York and Amsterdam. A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s penumbra. The penumbra causes a subtle darkening of the Moon's surface. In this case the moon passes for 92% through the penumbra and darkens the full moon, especially the northern side, that points to the very dark umbra. For the naked eye is the start and the end of the darkening hardly to see, but the dark shadow gliding over the northern side of the moon is good to observe in the middle of the eclipse. The eclipse starts at 12:15 UT and ends 16:51 UT, with at 14:33 UT the greatest eclipse. The dark shadow appears between 14:00 and 15:00 UT. Right you see the rare total penumbral eclipse of January 1999. You see here the difference between the full moon totally in the penumbra and totally outside. Source: NASA Eclipse Web Site with more information.

Visit around these dates: Spaceweather.com for observing tips, maps and links to live webcasts.


The dates and types of eclipses during 2011 are as follows.

2011 Jan 04: Partial Solar Eclipse.
Observers in Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East and parts of Asia can witness a partial eclipse of the sun. The penumbral shadow first touches Earth's surface in northern Algeria at 06:40 UT. As the shadow travels east, Western Europe will be treated to a partial eclipse at sunrise. Greatest eclipse  occurs at 08:50 UT in northern Sweden where the eclipse in the horizon will have a magnitude of 0.86 (86%), producing a fantastic crescent sunrise. Most of northern Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia also lie in the penumbra's path. A sunset eclipse will be visible from central Russia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia and northwest China. The partial eclipse ends when the penumbra leaves Earth at 11:00 UT.
Source: eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov

2011 Jun 01: Partial Solar Eclipse.
The event is only visible from high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The eclipse begins at sunrise in Siberia and northern China where the penumbral shadow first touches Earth at 19:25 UT. Two hours later, greatest eclipse occurs at 21:16 UT. At that time, an eclipse of magnitude 0.60 will be visible from the Arctic coast of western Siberia as the midnight Sun skirts the northern horizon. Although most of Alaska and northern Canada will witness the partial eclipse, the southern limit of the penumbra falls along a curve from south of Fairbanks to central New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Reykjavik, Iceland receives a 0.46 magnitude eclipse just before sunset. Northern most Norway, Sweden and Finland also get a midnight Sun eclipse with the event hanging above the northern horizon. The partial eclipse ends at 23:07 UT when the penumbra leaves Earth just north of Newfoundland in the Atlantic Ocean.
Source: eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.

Super moon eclips 2000-06-16. Photo AstroArts, Japan. 2011 Jun 15: Total Lunar Eclipse.
The entire event will be seen from the eastern half of Africa, the Middle East, central Asia and western Australia. Observers throughout Europe will miss the early stages of the eclipse because they occur before moonrise. Fortunately, totality will be seen throughout the continent except for northern Scotland and northern Scandinavia. Eastern Asia, eastern Australia, and New Zealand will miss the last stages of eclipse because they occur after moonset. Again, the total phase will be seen from most of these regions. Even observers in eastern Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina will witness totality. However, none of the eclipse will be visible from North America. At mid-eclipse, the Moon is near the zenith for observers from Reunion and Mauritius.
Partial eclipse begins: 18:23 UT. Total eclipse begins: 19:23 UT. Greatest eclipse: 20:13 UT. Total eclipse ends: 21:02 UT and Partial eclipse ends: 22:02 UT. A total eclipse can be very magnificent.
Source:  eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.

2011 Jul 01: Partial Solar Eclipse.
This Southern Hemisphere event is visible from a small region in the Antarctic Ocean, south of Africa. Such a remote and isolated event means that it may very well turn out to be the solar eclipse that nobody sees. At greatest eclipse (08:38 UT), the magnitude is just 0.10 (10%).
Source: eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.

2011 Nov 25: Partial Solar Eclipse.
The event is visible from high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere and includes southern South Africa, Antarctica, Tasmania and most of New Zealand At the instant of greatest eclipse (06:20) the eclipse magnitude is 0.91, making it the largest partial eclipse of the year. The greatest lunar shadow will pass a region near the coast of Antarctica (Southern Pacific).
Source: eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.

2011 Dec 10: Total Lunar Eclipse.Michael Boschat, Nova Scotia, Canada
The entire event is visible from Asia and Australia. For North Americans, the eclipse is in progress as the Moon sets, with western observers favored by a larger fraction of the eclipse before moonset. Observers throughout Europe and Africa will miss the early eclipse phases because they occur before moonrise. None of the eclipse can be seen from South America or Antarctica.
Partial eclipse begins: 12:46 UT. Total eclipse begins: 14:06 UT. Greatest eclipse: 14:32 UT. Total Eclipse ends: 14:57 UT and Partial eclipse ends: 16:18 UT.
Source: eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.


Antarctic Total Solar Eclipse 2003Solar and lunar eclipses for 2009 and 2010

Total solar eclipse 2009, above China, India and Himalaya: 22 July

Partial moon eclipse 2009: 31 December

Orange blue moonOn old year's eve around half past seven universal time (UT) we have a partially eclipse from about 8% for the umbra and 40% penumbra, visible all over Europe, Africa and some parts of Asia. For The Netherlands (Amsterdam) is the moon then standing in the East with an altitude of 35 degrees above the horizon. It's also a night of a full blue moon. A so called blue moon is the second full moon in the same month. Follow this web link for an animation. Photo left with an orange blue moon from photographer Doug Zubenel of Kansas.

Annular Solar Eclipse 2010: Jan 15

Partial moon eclipse 2010: 26 June

Paiific solar eclipse Total solar eclipse 2010 above the South Pacific: 11 July

Eclipse Tehran, Iran 2007-03-04 Total moon eclipse 2010: 21 December
The total eclipse lasts more than an hour from 02:41 am to 03:53 am EST on Tuesday morning, Dec. 21st. Any time within that interval is a good time to look for North America. Alas in North Europe not or hardly visible, because there is sunrise and moonset then.


Partially mooneclips 2008: 16 Augustus
Visit NASA Eclipse Web Site with information about all past lunar and solar eclipses.


Total mooneclipse in 2008: 20-21 Frebruary

Total mooneclipse in 2008 - Michael Boschat, Nova Scotia, CanadaIn the evening of 20 February the full moon enters in the cast shadow of the earth (umbra) at 08:43 pm Eastern Standard Time (EST). The moon leaves the cast shadow at 12.09 am EST. The total eclipse has a duration of almost an hour from 10:01 pm to 10:51 pm EST, when the moon can become almost invisible.When there are much clouds on the other side of the earth, then it is possible that the moon colors dark red because of diffused and reflected light in the atmosphere.

EST =  Universal Time + 5 hours (for winter-time).

The moon stands at the middle of the eclipse at 10:26 pm EST in the south about 60 degrees above the horizon of New York.

Webcam Gran Canaria with clear sky for observing eclipse 20-21 February 2008.


Total mooneclipses in 2007: 3 March and 28 August

In the evening of 3 March the full moon enters in the cast shadow of the earth (umbra) at  21:16 Central European Time (CET). The moon leaves the cast shadow at 03.25 CET.
CET =  Universal Time + 1 hour (for winter-time).

Eclipse Tehran, Iran 2007-03-04The total eclipse has a duration of more than an hour from 23:44 to 00:58 CET, when the moon can become almost invisible.When there are much clouds on the other side of the earth, then it is possible that the moon colors dark red because of diffused and reflected light in the atmosphere. The moon stands at the middle of the eclipse at 00:21 CET   in the south about 45 degrees above the horizon in western Europe.

Webcam Serviastro Madrid and Gran Canaria with clear sky for observing eclipse 3 March 2007.

The lunar eclips of 28 August 2007 is not visible in Europe, because it is daylight time there.


Total Eclipse of the Moon, 2004 May 4.

isfahan_thumbnail.jpg (1748 bytes)See USNO with data for this eclipse in Universal Time (UT).
Central European Time: CET = UT + 2 hours for summertime.

Live Webcast and Webcam in Esfahan, Iran. Splendid, with my compliments to ParsSky.com. Iran time = UT + 4.5 hours.
Click with your mouse on the thumbnail for a greater image from this astronomical site in Esfahan.

Total lunar eclipses in 2004:  May 4 and October 28


Total eclipse of the moon at 8/9 November 2003,  9 January 2001 and 16 July 2000 in this order.

In the night from 8 to 9 November, 2003  the full moon enters in the cast shadow of the earth (umbra) at midnight  around  00.32 hour Central European Time (CET). The moon leaves the cast shadow around 04.05 CET. The total eclipse has a duration of about an half hour from 2.06 to 2.31 CET, when the moon can become almost invisible.When there are much clouds on the other side of the earth, then it is possible that the moon colors dark red because of diffused and reflected light in the atmosphere. The moon stands at the middle of the eclipse at 02.19 CET  in the south-west about 50 degrees above the horizon in western Europe.
CET =  Universal Time + 1 hour (for winter-time).

See also: USNO with data for this eclipse in Universal Time
NASA with animation and information for this eclipse
Live astrocams for this eclipse: Universe today

At 9 January 2001 the full moon enters again in the cast shadow of the earth early in the evening at 19.42 hour Central European Time (CET). The moon leaves the cast shadow at 22.59 CET. The total eclipse has duration of about one hour from 20.50 until 21.52 CET, when the moon can become almost invisible.
Winter-time CET = UT +1 .

Jan. 9, 2001. Seen from the moon: A Total Eclipse of the Sun -- on the Moon!

Jan. 9, 2001. Live astrocams: Universe today   Splendid: Reunion Island

Jan. 9, 2001. Lunar eclipse gallery

Jan. 9, 2001. Netherlands: The eclipse photo's fom Joop Fenstra

2jfa0901.jpg (133620 bytes)
Friesland in the Netherlands. Eclipse photo's from photo-journalist Joop Fenstra.
Click with the mouse cursor on the photo for more.

Super eclipse at 16 July 2000. According to the USNO Lunar Eclipse computer is the total lunar eclipse at 16 July 2000 in Europe not visible. The eclipse starts at midday, when the full moon stands at the other side of the earth. The moon goes straight through the center of the earth's shadow, what causes that this eclipse is the longest since 1859.
maan1.jpg (11091 bytes)



You could see this 16 July 2000 super eclipse live on the site of Universe today via astrocams in Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Pole, etc. It started all on 16 July 2000 at 11.57 UT = 09.57 CET.


Photo AstroArts, Japan.
Click on the photo for more.


usno.gif (6979 bytes)
For the USNO On-line Lunar Eclipse Computer, click the logo
Needed data:
longitude east 5 degrees,  latitude north 52 degrees,
time zone 1 hour east of  Greenwich,  location Netherlands.
Time zone 2 hour east of Greenwich for summer time.



See also Fred Espenak's sun and moon Eclipse Home Page (NASA).

You can find there also links to live astrocams and a real time animation.


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Realm of the Nebulae | Journey through the universe

The realm of the Sun | Stars, planets and comets

About the Moon | Sun and moon eclipses

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